math geek with no social life
Pi fleece provides warmth, irrationality

mostlysignssomeportents:

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Thinkgeek’s Pi Fleece keeps you warm and irrational with the first 413 digits of Pi in machine-washable fleece, measuring 45”x64”.

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"What comes next?" Sloane’s database of sequences delivers an answerby Anna Haensch

What makes the sequence 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1,… so cool? In his blog for The Guardian, Alex Bellos explains that along with its crazy mathematical properties, it also has the distinction of being the second entry in the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences (OEIS). From the beloved Fibonacci sequence, to the more obscure Kolakoski sequence, the OEIS is a database of hundreds of thousands of integer sequences. It’s a tremendous technical tool for mathematics researchers, but also a cool resource for the casually number-curious. 

Neil SloaneThe OIES was created by Neil Sloane (left) when he was a graduate student at Cornell University in the 1960s. He was working with one particularly obscure sequence of integers, and it occurred to him that it would be handy to have a record of every integer sequence in the world. It started as a stack of 3 x 5 index cards on his desk, after a few decades became a book with 5,000 sequences, and eventually in 1996 a website with 10,000 sequences. Since then, the website has started crowdsourcing à la Wikipedia, and it now gathers about 15,000 new sequences each year. 

The OEIS was honored at a conference at the Center for Discrete Mathematics & Theoretical Computer Science (DIMACS) at Rutgers University recently, coinciding with the encyclopedia’s 50th anniversary, and founder Neil Sloane’s 75th birthday—a twofold celebration! Recently, the OEIS and the work of Sloane also got a nod in WordplayThe New York Times’s blog on crossword puzzles.

But wait, I still haven’t told the mathematical properties that make that sequence so cool. You can see that 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1,… is kind of boring, just 1’s and 2’s, so the numbers themselves aren’t all that remarkable. But notice that they always appear in runs of 1 or 2. So if we count the numbers of 1’s and 2’s and make a sequence out of that, we get 1,2,2,1,1,2,1,2,2,1,… —the original sequence! Pretty neat. There is only one other sequence that does this, and you get it by just removing the leading 1 from the sequence above. 

Watch 1,000 sequences be plotted at a rate of 2 per second.

See "Neil Sloane: the man who loved only integer sequences," by Alex Bello. Alex’s Adventures in Numberland—The Guardian, 7 October 2014.

via http://www.ams.org/news/math-in-the-media/mathdigest-index#201410-sloane

magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.

Contd from here

Found this in my local library. My reaction:

Found this in my local library. My reaction:

staceythinx:

Algorithmic Menagerie by Raven Kwok

Kwok on his project:

Algorithmic Menagerie is a continuation of and the MFA thesis work of my long term research exploring artificial life and self-organization in the field of computer-based generative art. Programmed in Processing, Algorithmic Menagerie is an interactive virtual environment inhabited by algorithmic creatures. These creatures with dynamic cellular structures are created using various methods of finite subdivision on geometric objects, and exhibit different kinds of biological interactions with each other, reaching an equilibrium within the simulated ecosystem. Audience participants are invited to intervene or interact in the life processes.

For the audio part of the project, I collaborated with my colleague K. Michael Fox, who designed unique sonification rule for each species and sonified the entire simulated eco-system in real-time using Super Collider.

See it in motion in this video:

Algorithmic Menagerie from Raven Kwok on Vimeo.

Genetic engineering will one day create the smartest humans who have ever lived.

WOW

Old Octonions may rule the World
On this day in 1843, the great Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton discovered a new kind of numbers called quaternions. Each quaternion has four parts, like the coordinates of a point in four dimensional space. Physical space has three dimensions, with coordinates ( x, y, z ) giving the East-West, North-South and Up-Down positions.
The quaternions could be added, subtracted, multiplied and divided like ordinary numbers, but there was a catch. Two quaternions multiplied together give different answers depending on the order: A times B is not equal to B times A. They break the algebraic rule called the commutative law of multiplication.
read more at: http://thatsmaths.com/2014/10/16/old-octonions-may-rule-the-world/

Old Octonions may rule the World

On this day in 1843, the great Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton discovered a new kind of numbers called quaternions. Each quaternion has four parts, like the coordinates of a point in four dimensional space. Physical space has three dimensions, with coordinates ( x, y, z ) giving the East-West, North-South and Up-Down positions.

The quaternions could be added, subtracted, multiplied and divided like ordinary numbers, but there was a catch. Two quaternions multiplied together give different answers depending on the order: A times B is not equal to B times A. They break the algebraic rule called the commutative law of multiplication.

read more at: http://thatsmaths.com/2014/10/16/old-octonions-may-rule-the-world/

Eliza vs Gamergate

mostlysignssomeportents:

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When some genius set up a 1960s non-directive chatbot psychotherapist to reply to #notyourshield tweets, hilarity ensued!

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mothernaturenetwork:

New particle could explain what keeps matter togetherThe particle may provide new insights into the gap between matter and the ever elusive antimatter.

mothernaturenetwork:

New particle could explain what keeps matter together
The particle may provide new insights into the gap between matter and the ever elusive antimatter.