math geek with no social life
mathhombre:

Admiral Smackbar.
Using this in class tomorrow.

mathhombre:

Admiral Smackbar.

Using this in class tomorrow.

dataanxiety:

mainframe longevity:

To a large extent, the mainframe’s longevity is a result of two major architectural innovations introduced with S/360. The first was the notion of a family of computers, from low to high performance, all based on the same instruction set which allowed customers to upgrade to larger systems as well as to future models without having to rewrite their applications.
The second was OS/360, a common operating system that supported the various members of the S/360 family except for the smaller ones which ran a subset with more limited capabilities. Today’s z/Architecture and z/OS are direct descendants of the original S/360 and OS/360. —Irving Wladawsky-Berger, The Wall Street Journalibm.com/mainframe50

If that seems too much like native advertising (Irving Wladawsky-Berger is such an IBM fanboi ;O) then pay a visit to Seeking Alpha with me. They live and breathe capitalism over there. Regarding IBM in general and the mainframe in particular, I found A Moat Full of Immortal Dinosaurs. Warren Buffet looks for “economic castles protected by unbreachable moats.” Good moats protect businesses from their competitors. They are made of brand power, scale/ cost advantages or intellectual property. The mainframe business is IBM’s very strong moat.

dataanxiety:

mainframe longevity:

To a large extent, the mainframe’s longevity is a result of two major architectural innovations introduced with S/360. The first was the notion of a family of computers, from low to high performance, all based on the same instruction set which allowed customers to upgrade to larger systems as well as to future models without having to rewrite their applications.

The second was OS/360, a common operating system that supported the various members of the S/360 family except for the smaller ones which ran a subset with more limited capabilities. Today’s z/Architecture and z/OS are direct descendants of the original S/360 and OS/360.
—Irving Wladawsky-Berger, The Wall Street Journal
ibm.com/mainframe50

If that seems too much like native advertising (Irving Wladawsky-Berger is such an IBM fanboi ;O) then pay a visit to Seeking Alpha with me. They live and breathe capitalism over there. Regarding IBM in general and the mainframe in particular, I found A Moat Full of Immortal Dinosaurs. Warren Buffet looks for “economic castles protected by unbreachable moats.” Good moats protect businesses from their competitors. They are made of brand power, scale/ cost advantages or intellectual property. The mainframe business is IBM’s very strong moat.

Like every previous theory of physics, quantum theory will turn out only approximately true, applying within a limited domain only
Our quantum reality problem – Adrian Kent – Aeon Magazine (via aeonmagazine)
Because in the end, you won’t remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. Climb that goddamn mountain.
Jack Kerouac (via quotes-shape-us)

sweetteascience:

thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

I remember first reading about this in a book. I was fascinated then, but having gifs to see it in action is so much better!

bigblueboo:

rotation wave
twit • giphy • insta • vine 

bigblueboo:

rotation wave

twit • giphy • insta • vine 

Get 2600’s archives from 1987

mostlysignssomeportents:

image

Emmanuel Goldstein from 2600 Magazine writes, “Volume 4 of The Hacker Digest has been put into PDF format, comprised of issues of 2600 Magazine from 1987.”

Read more…